Tuesday, March 24, 2015

MARCH 24, 1980: A FUTURE NOT OUR OWN

Blessed Oscar Romero, Bishop and Martyr
August 15, 1917 - March 24, 1980
Episcopal Motto: Sentire Cum Ecclesia
"To Think With The Church" (Saint Ignatius Loyola)


It helps, now and then, to step back
and take the long view.
The kingdom is not only beyond our efforts,
it is beyond our vision. 

We accomplish in our lifetime only a tiny fraction of
the magnificent enterprise that is God's work.
Nothing we do is complete,
which is another way of saying
that the kingdom always lies beyond us. 

No statement says all that could be said
No prayer fully expresses our faith.
No confession brings perfection.
No pastoral visit brings wholeness.
No programme accomplishes the church's mission.
No set of goals and objectives includes everything. 

This is what we are about:
We plant seeds that one day will grow.
We water seeds already planted, knowing that they hold future promise.
We lay foundations that will need further development.
We provide yeast that produces effects beyond our capabilities. 

We cannot do everything
and there is a sense of liberation in realizing that.
This enables us to do something,
and to do it very well.
It may be incomplete, but it is a beginning, a step along the way,
an opportunity for God's grace to enter and do the rest. 

We may never see the end result,
but that is the difference between the master builder and the worker.
We are workers, not master builders,
ministers, not messiahs.
We are prophets of a future not our own.

Blessed Oscar Romero

Vox Populi

Vox Dei
Beatification: May 23, 2015



March 24: Oscar Arnulfo Romero and the Martyrs of El Salvador
from Holy Women, Holy Men (Episcopal Church of the United States)

Óscar Arnulfo Romero y Galdémez was born on August 15 , 1917 , in San Salvador. At the age of twelve, he was apprenticed to a carpenter, but was later able to attend seminary. His family’s economic circumstances forced him to withdraw to work in a gold mine. Ultimately he entered another seminary and was eventually sent to the Gregorian University in Rome to study theology. After his ordination to the priesthood, he returned to his native land, where he worked among the poor, served as an administrator for the Church, and started an Alcoholics Anonymous group in San Miguel.

When he was appointed a bishop, radicals distrusted his conservative sympathies. However, after his appointment as Archbishop of San Salvador in 1977 , a progressive Jesuit friend of his, Rutilio Grande, was assassinated, and Romero began protesting the government’s injustice to the poor and its policies of torture. He met with Pope John Paul II in 1980  and complained that the leaders of El Salvador engaged in terror and assassinations. He also pleaded with the American government to stop military aid to his country, but this request was ignored.

Romero was shot to death while celebrating Mass at a small chapel near his cathedral on March 24 , 1980 . The previous day, he preached a sermon calling on soldiers to disobey orders that violated human rights. He had said, “A bishop will die, but the Church of God which is the people will never perish.” The Roman Catholic Church declared him “a servant of God,” and he is honored as a martyr by many Christian denominations worldwide.

Almost nine months after Romero’s assassination, three Sisters and their lay associate were also killed in the course of their duties by the El Salvadoran army. Nine Jesuit priests were similarly murdered in November of 1989 . A statue of Romero stands at the door of Westminster Abbey as part of a commemoration of twentieth-century martyrs.


Almighty God, you called your servant Óscar Romero
to be a voice for the voiceless poor,
and to give his life as a seed of freedom and a sign of hope:
Grant that, inspired by his sacrifice
and the example of the martyrs of El Salvador,
we may without fear or favor
witness to your Word who abides, your Word who is Life,
even Jesus Christ our Lord, to whom, with you and the Holy Spirit,
be praise and glory now and for ever. Amen.

11 comments:

  1. Beautiful Father D thank you. Googled it but couldn't find any pics of Romero in his cappa magna. Wonder what Sample and Slattery and Burke and those guys think when they see this man in action and in death?

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  2. Yeah but how many jars of creamed honey could he move?

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  3. On another topic, it seems that the Lacy-one does not have an opinion on the liquefication of the blood of Saint Januarius in the presence of Pope Francis this past weekend.
    Could he be REALLY pissed off that the last time that this happened in the presence of a Pope was Pope (syllabus of errors) Pius lX? Definitely no "modernist" that one.
    Strange how he post pics of astronomical things all of the time and vaguely threatens his toadies that "the end is near" ( i.e. "send me money" ) but he doesn't say a thing about this apparent miracle.

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    1. He will not refer to this as a miracle. He will call it a "phenomenon".
      However he spins it, he will denigrate the whole thing in his passive-aggressive way.

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    2. Actually 11:42AM the phenomenon is Mr.Stoolsdorf. He will be seen to be a holdout (as it were) against the advancement of the Church of Christ.

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  4. Check out this link! Join Zildo's pilgrimage for the LOW LOW price of $3,799!
    He's not the tour guide but the tour's chaplain, you see.
    http://oc-travel.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/Registration-Summorum-Pontificum-Tour-2015.pdf
    "I want to bring to your attention the upcoming annual Summorum Pontificum pilgrimage to Rome in October. It is handled by Orbis Catholicus and my friend John Sonnen. I will be going.

    19-29 October. (My birthday will be in Rome!)

    The pilgrimage will be after the close of the Synod, so we wouldn’t have to meet all those… you know.

    I was with the pilgrimage last year and things went pretty well. I am pretty sure they will be even better this year.

    This year, instead of going to Orvieto for a day trip we are going to go to Norcia! (Hint: Benedictines, sausage and BEER)

    BTW.. it was in the context of last year’s trip that, during the visit to the Swiss Guards’ barracks, I started planning the Breastplate Project. I suspect that we will be warmly received by them this year.

    Also, we attended a Pontifical Mass with Card. Burke.


    Daddy Z-Bucks wants Benedictine sausage in his mouth, STAT! And you know he swallows...'BEER'.

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    1. I am sure that the Swiss Guard will set out wine and cheese for him and discuss more ways to fleece people out of money.

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    2. Dont taint a nice post about a holy martyr with talk of a repulsive grifter so contrary to everything about Romero. Please.

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    3. You say "don't" but I guess I already did so... sorry?
      In my defense, it's not my taint; it's John Zuhlsdorf's taint.
      Zildo, Burke, Merkin... this is Romero's church in 2015. If the Krazies are losing influence it isn't because they've been defeated by a new army of Romeros, but because nobody cares anymore.

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    4. I am guessing that the Swiss Guard has better things to do than allow this one to mince around and fawn all over them.
      Can you imagine the comments about him in the locker room?

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  5. Wonderful tribute to Archbishop Romero, Father. Just one correction. The prayer you've cited here (A Step Along the Way) is frequently attributed to Romero. In actuality, it was composed by Ken Untener (who eventually served as bishop of Saginaw, 1980-2004). I believe Untener wrote it for use by Cardinal Dearden in Detroit shortly after Romero's death. Here's a link to it on the USCCB site, where Untener is credited at the bottom of the prayer: http://www.usccb.org/prayer-and-worship/prayers-and-devotions/prayers/archbishop_romero_prayer.cfm

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