Wednesday, January 15, 2014

Burke, the only Pastor among his Sheep-- taking on their smell

Raimunda Buke seen trying to pick up rough trade in a Roman backstreet ("when trying to pick up rough trade in Rome, cardinals usually dress as simple monsignori, so as not to give scandal to the faithful")





Of course, you might recognize him more easily in this photo.


 When asked to comment

11 comments:

  1. Fr,

    It becomes clear that when your career as an English actor fails:

    http://images.smh.com.au/2010/09/07/1912150/johnmansi-420x0.jpg

    join the college of Cardinals.

    http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-7C36VW_mKO8/UTTQ_vvU3lI/AAAAAAAAFI4/lTsc3_EM9Ms/s1600/Burke-Galero%2Bin%2Breal%2Bcardinal%2Bhat.jpeg

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. All snark, sarcasm and kidding aside, who, after dressing up in this outfit (not participating in a renaissance faire or historic reenactment) does not look in the mirror and say, "NO WAY! This is just TOO ridiculous!"

      I'm not a minimalist. I don't like the tacky rainbow and butterfly vestments. I am very much on the side of Tradition, as long as it serves a purpose in our spiritual and/or religious life. I cannot for the life of me understand what purpose such an extreme amount of glitz and glam in the above photo of Cardinal Burke in galero and cappa magna, actually serves.

      Anyone? Without tossing around polemical hot-words like "modernism" or "fruits Vatican II" "Liberal" etc, etc. Please explain to me.

      Delete
    2. "The cappa magna does indeed represent the finery of the world, its power and prestige. That is why after his entrance wearing it, the prelate is publicly stripped of this finery and humbled before the congregation. Then, vestment by vestment, the bishop is clothed in the new man of which St Paul speaks, including the baptismal alb, the dalmatic of charity, the stole of pardon and the chasuble of mercy. When finally clothed in Christ, the prelate makes a second entrance into the church to begin the eucharistic celebration in persona Christi, the visible head of the body, the church.

      It was a clear statement that the power and prestige of the world have no place at the altar, but it is expressed in a liturgical ritual or symbol, which, unfortunately, are often lacking in the contemporary rites and thus hard to grasp.” - Msgr. Patrick Brankin, diocese of Tulsa, after Bishop Slattery wore the cappa.

      Could there be other ways of demonstrating this in the liturgy? Certainly.

      Nevertheless, the Church does allow the use of the cappa in the current Ceremonial of Bishops. Maybe I'm being naive, but if the Church allows it, I think there's a place for it.

      Delete
    3. Well.. The Cappa Magna was obviously at the dry cleaners.. Duh.

      As for why certain priests dress like they do, here is my stab at it. People who are poor leaders tend to rely heavily on ceremony and pomp as a substitute. Burke seems to be very abrasive person and a poor leader. He hurt a lot of people in St. Louis and was such a divisive archbishop that he was essentially kicked upstairs to the Curia. I think that he uses clothes to project his power because he cannot effectively lead through his personality. Of course, the Cappa Magna and other traditional clothing just make him look silly because they have lost their original meaning.

      Delete
  2. Cappas magna are of such length because they're meant to be worn while riding. They quite literally are meant to cover a horse's ass. Who better to dress in on than Burke?

    ReplyDelete
  3. Has anyone ever asked Cardinal Burke or Fr. Z point blank whether or not they're gay or, as they might put it "struggling with intrinsically disordered same sex attractions"? I think it's fair since they both like to make statements on the subject. Do they get a pass because they profess to be celibate?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. i dont think anyone has, ive been following our prussian presbyter for years and im pretty good on picking up on subtle things and homosexuality isnt something i suspect him of. anyways zuhlsdorf is a very bitter (and i suspect very depressed) man. why else would he be so focused on materialism and be such a clericalist? i dont think he has much self worth so his subconscious goes for externals. a lot of times i find myself feeling bad for him - nonetheless his scandalous behavior warrants the satire on this blog.

      gays are a good target for him because:

      1 they irritate him to no end politically

      2 another way to vent his general unfocused anger about the way his life ended up

      3 and also (probably the main reason for his rants) helps rally the faithful for donations for him.

      honestly i hope he one day decides to amend his ways get rid of any possible excess (lol) and join a religious order... perhaps his friars of the immaculate? zuhlsdorf's italian could go a long way in the new evangelization (we will just make sure the local deacon does the preaching) - but nope he's cooped up there in the steampunk valve center or whatever bizarre name he calls that suite the bishop of madison is letting him shack up in

      Delete
    2. Readerette here. I agree with your analysis. Why though, is he a bitter angry dude? Why did his life end up being living in a steam pipe distribution complex or whatever he calls it? How did he fuck up so royally as to get banished from Rome?

      Delete
    3. honestly i have no idea. guessing i think a good chuck of it has to do with him thinking in his younger years getting new life in Italy would allow him to start over and he would find happiness. of course that didn't happen, which brought even more bitterness. i think he's just a difficult person to work with by nature and he couldn't really get along too well with the strong personalities he encountered in Italy, many of them probably people in authority. Thus the self imposed exile to the American Midwest.

      Delete
  4. He still looks to come up behind Cardinal Rode:
    http://quotesandmusings.blogspot.com/2009/10/cardinal-rode-photos.html

    ReplyDelete